Anthony Gifford
Post Christian Author and Speaker
                                   Reviews for                                     CHURCHES: A Time To Die - Hope For New Life

Based on no more analysis than the fact that the number of seats in pews each Sunday morning continues to decline, we can’t help but agree with Anthony Gifford that Christian churches are in serious trouble.

In his clear, highly readable, and ultimately optimistic book, Gifford explains how Christianity has come to this impass.  Gifford claims, with good evidence and strong arguments, that various political and social forces have reshaped and twisted the original message of Jesus until it is, in practice, all but unrecognizable.  

Gifford claims the essence of Jesus’s message is love:  love of God, love of family, love of all fellow humans, love of self.   Gifford says we need to let Jesus’s message regrow from the roots, after much of the current structure of Christianity has withered on the vine.

I agree with Gifford in the essentials of his message.  But even if I didn’t agree, I would argue strongly that everyone living within Christian culture should know and understand his arguments.  It is obvious that reform is needed;  I believe Gifford shows both the need and the path forward.

If you care at all about the religious and moral condition of our culture you should read Anthony Gifford’s fine, important book.   Gifford’s arguments will be challenging to anyone strongly connected to any Christian church.  But be brave.  Read Gifford lovingly and discover that he has an important message that is not incompatible with your deepest faith.

        Carl McCrosky, Electrical Engineer, Professor, sailor and farmer.


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I found Gifford's book to be so engaging and powerful as it forced me to look at 'religion' in a  different way. Suddenly real people were caring about real things. Their beliefs actually held them close. I am not sure if Gifford's optimistic view of transformation and change is possible in the rather scientific, mechanical (computers et al), selfish and uncommitted world we live in. However, for even a few moments, hope is a wonderful experience.

       Judith Wambera, academic


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I read Anthony’s book and I was cheered to hear about his message of inclusivity of all religions.  I was raised Jewish.  I attended some Church services and I was shocked and saddened to hear how Jews were described in the New Testament.  Because of this I stopped attending the services.  I wanted a place to feel welcomed and accepted.  The words in the passages read made me feel neither.  I felt that my people were being demonized.  I knew that I was a good person and the words in The New Testament did not reflect that.  After reading Anthony’s book, Churches.  A Time to Die – Hope For A New Life, I  felt uplifted.  The construct of people getting together and helping each other, without judgement,  resonated with me in a positive way.     Sharen English.


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 .... I found Gifford's book to be so engaging and powerful as it forced me to look at "relgion" in a different way. Suddenly real people were caring about real things. Their beliefs actually held them close. I am not sure if Gifford's optimistic view of transformation and change is possible in the rather scientific, mechanical (computer et al), selfish and uncommitted world we live in. However, for even a few moments, hope is a wonderful experience.

     Judith Wambera, academic


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